Herbs for Healthy Skin

I like receiving information from all sources. The article I’m linking to here was sent to me from a web page called BioClarity. The article contains information on 17 herbs you can grow at home that will aid in having healthy skin. Since there are so many herbs, there’s surely one- or more- that everyone can grow and use.

https://www.bioclarity.com/pages/17-plants-you-can-grow-at-home-for-radiant-skin/

Below are some samples of the article.

 

Calendula

These vibrant flowers are easy to grow and work as a fantastic component of natural skin care recipes. Not only will your garden look bright—your face will, too! Calendula oil is derived from marigold flowers, and can be used in a host of ways. It offers anti-inflammatory properties, and can soothe itchy skin conditions. It’s also a fantastic antiseptic, and can help speed up wound healing for those dealing with cuts, wounds, acne sores, and other skin ailments.

Topical Benefits: Infuse calendula into your favorite oils to make homemade lotion, salve, and even hair products. Apply calendula oil to dry skin or chapped lips for some added moisture.

Growing Tips: This bright flower thrives in areas of the yard that are partially shaded or receive full sun. Prepare a garden bed in the back yard with organic potting soil before planting. Be sure to water your calendula well and pinch off decaying blooms and petals regularly to extend the blooming period. Hint: calendula are actually great at repelling insects, so plant them near your vegetable garden to serve as natural pesticide.

 

Cilantro

Next time you’re chopping up cilantro for your favorite guacamole or salsa recipe, consider the benefits this herb offers for your skin. Eating cilantro provides plenty of health benefits, including decreased cholesterol and digestive issue relief, but it can also pack a powerful punch when it comes to skin care. Cilantro is jam-packed with antioxidants that fight free radicals, and provides a potent dose of Vitamin C. Cilantro has antibacterial and antifungal properties, and can help soothe inflammation for those with acne-prone skin.

Ingestible Benefits: Throw cilantro into your favorite salad or dish to soothe your digestive system and decrease high cholesterol levels.

Topical Benefits: Grind coriander seeds and mix the powder into your favorite DIY mask to take advantage of its soothing, anti-inflammatory benefits.

Growing Tips: This aromatic herb does best in sunny or lightly shaded areas in southern zones. Make sure your soil is moist and well-draining. As you begin to plant, be sure to leave around seven inches between each seed; if you want to maintain your fresh cilantro, sow them every two to three weeks.

Here’s the link if you’d like to read more.

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Peppermint

Candy Cane
Candy Cane

Peppermint, Mentha piperata.

Peppermint doesn’t really get the respect it deserves, in my estimation. It’s commonly found in most herb collections and many people eschew it due to its invasive habit.

Peppermint Leaves
Peppermint Leaves

And, it’s not new! Or exotic! Or called a SuperFood.

But! Peppermint is a herb for all around use! I hope you long-time herb lovers will find new information here. And for those of you who have recently discovered the wonderful world of herbs, you will find some ways to use peppermint you weren’t yet aware of, growing tips and other useful information.

Description

Peppermint is a perennial mint with coarsely serrated leaves which can reach more than 2 inches (5 cm) in length. The stems are square and can be from green to reddish in color. The flowers are pink to red, form in the leaf axils of the upper leaves and are placed in whorls of loose spikes. The whole plant can reach to 36 inches (1 m) high in a favorable environment.

peppermint
Botanical Drawing of Peppermint

 

True Peppermint is a sterile hybrid between Water Mint, M. aquatic and Spearmint, M. spicata.

This means that Peppermint does not produce viable seed. So if you see Peppermint seed for sale, you will not get true Peppermint by growing it out, but, rather, a form of Spearmint with, often, a less than pleasing aroma and taste.

 Because the mints which make up Peppermint are themselves somewhat variable, not all Peppermint smells or tastes the same. If you find a Peppermint that you really like, the best way to keep it going is through vegetative propagation: stem or root cuttings, ground layering or division.

Other Mints in the Peppermint Family

Mints in general are very promiscuous, crossing with each other when in flower at the same time. This habit can cause your mints to lose character over time, so if you have a mint you especially like, keep it isolated from its brethren, or you may lose the properties of it that you like the best. The following are either found cultivars or man-made ones that are popular.

Orange MintMentha piperata f. citrata ‘Orange’– Hardy perennial grows up to 32 inches (30 cm) with an indefinite spread. Small, pale pink flowers. Large rounded leaves, oval, dark green, can be tinged with purple. Citrusy scent.

Black PeppermintMentha piperata– Hardy perennial grows up to 2 feet, (60 cm), leaves pointed, oval and toothed on the margin, dark plum brown tinged with green.

Grapefruit MintMentha X piperata var. citrata has very rounded, fuzzy leaves, grows taller than many other Peppermints and has a citrus-like flavor.

Chocolate Mint, is a cultivar of Peppermint that smells and tastes somewhat of chocolate. It is a favorite for sauces to be served over ice cream. It has shiny, dark green leaves and dark stems.

Cultivation

Most mints are easy to grow and Peppermint is no exception. In fact, many people consider it a garden pest if it escapes into the landscape. Of course, that definition is in the eye of the beholder. If you really like Peppermint Tea or want to make Peppermint Essential Oil, you’ll need lots of Peppermint leaves, so a rambling plant may be just what you need. If not, mints grow quite well contained in pots or hanging baskets.

Peppermint likes cool moist roots and to grow into the sun. If you live in a desert area or the hot, humid Gulf Coast South, as I do, mints can tend to fail in the heat of the summer. My recommendation is to grow your mint where the plant gets morning sun and afternoon shade, especially in the summer. Under a deciduous tree is perfect- Winter sun, Summer shade.

If you’re growing your mint in a container, you can give it lots of Winter and early Spring sun, then move it to a spot where it’s shaded from the searing late summer sun. Or… you can move to Seattle or Milwaukee or Pittsburg and grow your mint in full sun where it will thrive and try to take over the neighborhood.

Peppermint is hardy to Zone 5 and grows in a wide range of soils. It likes water and does well where herbs that need better drainage will not do well. I’ve seen it growing happily under the drip of a room air conditioner or near a faucet in the garden. In containers, it still needs decent drainage. Don’t neglect to water it.

For best results with Peppermint, it’s best to divide and replant an established plant every 3 to 4 years. Cut plants back after flowering to encourage new leaf growth. Leave the flowers until they fade, though, as they attract butterflies and beneficial insects such as hover flies to the garden. In high heat areas, cutting your Peppermint back in late summer will cause fresh, new growth to come out once the fall weather arrives and you’ll have a new crop to harvest.

Healthy Peppermint Plant
Healthy Peppermint Plant

Continue reading “Peppermint”

Chia Seeds- Tiny Powerhouses!

In keeping with my attempt to bring healthy eating and living to readers, I thought the article on Chia Seeds would be of interest. Chia seeds are not exotic nor hard to find, nor expensive. They are grown here in the U.S., are not endangered or imported. And… they have myriad uses.

I like them sprinkled on my homemade cereal and in muffins and quick breads.

This article from Organic Authority has the scoop on Chia Seeds. 

Here’s more on Chia Seeds from Health Ambition.

Here’s another, more in depth, article on Chia Seeds from Positive Healthwellness Blog.

Happy Reading!

How to Ward Off Dementia

In my endeavor to bring Health and Wellness information into my website, here’s a short article defining steps everyone can take to help minimize the risk of any various forms of dementia.

While there’s no known cure for dementia (yet), there are steps you can take to reduce your risk and in some cases even reverse symptoms of the disease.

Source: How to Ward Off Dementia

Resistance to Change

 

imageBeing a woman of a certain age, I consciously attempt to make my life into one that is the best for me. I enjoy my life and try to live it stress-free.

I practice and teach yoga, swim on a regular basis, walk with my husband on our farm, try to limit my calorie intake so the pounds don’t sneak up on me and, of course enjoy all my healthy herbs in the nutritious foods we eat.

I find inspiration and ideas in various blogs and articles I read about the practice of yoga, cooking, aging gracefully and health. I attempt to do this without stress or judgement.

With the idea that others are looking for some of the same information and, possibly, motivation, as I am, I’ve decided to add a section to The Herb Cottage Website covering topics such as health, aging, exercise and the like.

Feel free to leave comments, point me to other sources and, most of all, do what’s best for you. You know yourself better than anyone else and, remember, it’s your life and you only get this one chance to live it.

Here’s a link to a post I really like on Summer Tomato. I hope you find it as helpful as I did: Resistance to Change